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Let’s take a moment to acknowledge how awesome baby swings are. If you’ve got a fussy infant who just can’t fall asleep… try a baby swing. If your arms are feeling jello-y and weak after juggling three kids all day long… try a baby swing. If you want to free yourself to clean the living room before guests come over… try a baby swing. Or if you just want to give your little tyke a few minutes of relaxation or entertainment… try a baby swing.

In other words: if you have an infant, you should have a baby swing.

You might be wondering:

Isn’t it better if someone’s holding and snuggling with my baby? Perhaps. But sometimes parents/relatives/babysitters need a break too—especially if you just can’t get your newborn to relax or fall asleep any other way.

That being said, a baby swing should never be a substitute for a human caregiver. Think of it as a temporary form of relief—for you and your child. 

Now:

It’s just as important to know how to use a baby swing as it is to know which ones are the best. 

Consumer Reports, LiveStrong, and a number of other sources have previously reported on baby swing risks as well as best practices. If you’re not already aware of these, consider the fact that in 2005, 1,800 children were injured by a baby swing. Or that in 2015, there was a well-publicized infant mortality as a result of improper use of a baby swing.

If infants are left unattended in baby swings or they’re used incorrectly, there is a risk for injury and, albeit less commonly, death. Always be sure to read the safety advice before using your baby swing and follow the manufacturer’s recommendations:

  • Always keep an eye on your child when they’re in their swing.
  • Start on the lowest setting first to acclimate your baby to the swinging motion.
  • Place the baby swing on a flat and un-elevated surface.
  • Be sure to buy a swing that provides the right kind of support.
  • Baby swings should always have a safety harness (five-point harnesses are the best).
  • Never leave your child in their swing all night and be mindful, in general, of how much time they spend in it. 
  • Keep in mind age appropriateness; baby swings are not intended for children that can wriggle their way out of them.

What’s the bottom line?

There’s a lot to consider when it comes to finding the right baby swing for your child. Be sure to familiarize yourself with the risks as well as the best practices.

When you’re ready, we’ll invite you to take a look at Faveable’s picks for the best baby swings for 2017. There were a lot of factors to take into consideration, so we spent countless hours reviewing suggestions from leading baby experts as well as insights from actual customers to bring you the safest, most reliable picks.

A few years back we reviewed the Rockaroo for new dads. This year’s recommendations include picks from well-known brands like Fisher-Price and Graco, as well as a couple new additions.

Updated: 3 weeks ago