6 Best Ways to Treat Runner's Knee

6 Best Ways to Treat Runner's Knee

#1
TriggerPoint GRID Foam Roller
#2
DonJoy Armor FourcePoint Knee Brace
#3
Shock Doctor Ultra Knee Supporter
#4
4-Inch ACE Elastic Bandage

Running is one of the best forms of cardio, hands down! Not only is it amazing exercise, but you'll find that it's wonderfully freeing to hit the open road and run the hours away. You sort of self-hypnotize as you focus on your breath, your muscles, and your running. It's a great way to get in a wicked lower body/cardio workout!

But, if you are a regular runner, you may find yourself suffering from one of the most common injuries: runner's knee.

Did You Know: Up to 40% of complaints in sports medicine clinics are runner's knee? 25% of the general recreational running population suffers from runner's knee!

Here is everything you need to know about this injury…

What is Runner's Knee?

Runner's knee is the simple name for "patellofemoral pain syndrome", a repetitive stress injury that occurs when the kneecap (patella) rests on your thighbone. The bone on bone contact can cause pain--both acute (sharp) and chronic (dull)--along with a number of other symptoms (see below).

Oddly enough, the pain may disappear when you run, only to return when you cool down. There are a number of things that can cause this knee pain after running:

Biomechanical issues -- If your leg bones are out of position, misaligned, or malformed from birth, or your kneecap is slightly out of position, the impact on your legs won't be evenly distributed. These biomechanical issues will place higher stress on certain parts of your body, leading to wear and potential injuries to your joints.

Overuse --As mentioned above, runners knee is a repetitive stress injury, which can result from overuse of the joint. If you perform a lot of high-impact activity (lower body workouts, running, jump training, etc.), the activity can cause inflammation in the kneecap joint. Tendons that have been overstretched may also be the cause.

Direct trauma -- If you fall and land directly on your knee, the trauma may lead to runner's knee. The same is true for a direct blow to the kneecap.

Muscular weakness/imbalance -- If your thigh and hip muscles are poorly conditioned, they aren't able to bear up under the strain of your running. Your body will usually make up for it by adjusting your gait or shifting your weight, which could lead to incorrect running posture and ultimately knee injuries. Weak or tight hamstrings, hips, quads, glutes, and lower back muscles can all contribute to a higher risk of knee injuries.

Foot problems -- If you have flat feet, high arches, feet that turn inward or outward, or hypermobile feet (ankle and foot joints that move more than "normal"), your stride may cause wear and tear on your joints, or can lead to biomechanical issues with your knees. The joints and tissues of your knee will be strained, leading to runner's knee.

Symptoms of Runners Knee

Many people experience knee pain after running--or even during their run-- but how can you know if it's runner's knee or some other injury?

According to Web MD, runner's knee is a very specific type of pain. It will be located around or behind your kneecap, particularly where the patella meets the femur (your thigh bone). However, Breaking Muscle states that the pain is located at the front of the knee, often below the kneecap.

If this is a bit too vague to help you be certain, here are a few more symptoms of runner's knee to look out for:

Pain during exercise -- The pain will usually set in SPECIFICALLY during exercises that involve repeated bending of your knee: Squats, Lunges, Stair Climbing, Jumping, etc.

Pain when you bend your knee -- When you walk, kneel, squat, or stand up, does your knee hurt? Such simple activities shouldn't cause knee pain, so any discomfort is a sign that something is wrong. The pain will usually grow worse when you walk downhill or go down stairs.

Pain after long periods of sitting -- When you stand up from your office desk, the movie theater, or in an airplane, do your knees hurt? Pain after prolonged periods of sitting are an indication of runner's knee.

Swelling -- Swelling is ALWAYS a sign of injury! While it's not specific to just one knee injury, it's a good indication (when combined with other signs) that the problem is runner's knee.

Grinding/Popping/Crackling --Does your knee make sounds when you stand up? If your knees grind, pop, or crack--especially after sitting or when climbing stairs--it's an indication of runner's knee.

These symptoms all point toward runner's knee, but there's only one way to be certain: get checked out! Get yourself to a doctor for a physical exam, or undergo an MRI, X-rays, or CT Scan to be certain that it's runner's knee and not some other knee problem.

Note: Runner's knee is NOT the same as a meniscus tear. The pain of a meniscus tear is located on the inner (medial) or outer (lateral) sides of your knee. Meniscus tear symptoms are similar to runner's knee symptoms (pain when moving or exercising), but your knee will often swell up, lock, or even give way when you use your legs. Torn meniscus treatment differs from treatment for runner's knee, which is why it's so important that a doctor diagnoses the problem after a thorough exam.

How to Treat Runner's Knee

There's good news and bad news about runner's knee pain treatment:

The Bad News: You're going to have to quit running for a while, at least until your knee heals. This may be a hard saying for some, but it's worth it!

The Good News: You'll be back on your feet sooner than you'd think. Runner's knee is usually a fairly minor injury, so time and simple knee pain treatment will usually be enough to deal with the problem!

Before we get into treatment for runner's knee, let's look at a few ways to PREVENT it:

  • Change Your Running Surface -- Instead of running on concrete or hard-packed earth, run on a softer surface: running tracks, forest trails, grass, etc. The softer the surface, the less impact on your joints! 
  • Increase Mileage Gradually -- Did you know that adding too much distance to your runs can increase your risk of injuries? Make it a point to only increase mileage by 10% per week!
  • Add More Hill Work -- Your body needs to get used to tackling hills--both up and downhills. Don't push yourself too hard, but do acclimate your body to hills by adding more hill work to your runs.
  • Shorten Your Stride on Hills -- The longer your stride on up- and down-hills, the greater the impact on the joints. When running up and down hills, shorten your stride and slow your run speed. You'll engage your leg and core muscles more effectively, taking the strain off your knees.
  • Find the Right Shoes -- You need a pair of shoes with the right arch support and cushioning, and that fit well. Buy shoes specifically for the type of running you do! (Check out our article Shoes Matter, Here's How to Choose the Best Running Shoes for You for a complete guide to choosing running shoes…)
  • Strengthen Your Lower Body -- If your hips, glutes, hamstrings, quads, and lower back muscles aren't able to handle the strain, you're more likely to suffer injuries. Spend more time strengthening those muscles in order to keep up with your runs!

These things will all help you to avoid runner's knee in the future, but what can you do to deal with the problem RIGHT NOW?

Rest -- Most important of all, it's time to GET OFF THAT LEG! The more you use the knee, the longer it will take for your body to repair the damage. You may not be able to spend weeks in bed, but you should try to limit your movement until the pain goes away. Definitely take a break from running for a week or three.

Ice Your Knee -- Ice helps to reduce swelling, speeding up the healing process. As you are giving your knees a rest, apply an ice pack to the injured area. You'll find that it will do wonders! (Check out the Faves below for an EPIC ice pack…)

Use a Compress/Knee Brace -- It's always a good idea to wrap your knee or use a knee brace when injured. Why is this? Knee support serves two purposes: it reduces the risk of further injury, and it increases blood flow to the injured area. Wrap the knee with an ACE bandage or wear a knee brace for a few days after the pain disappears. (We've got a few good options in the Fave list below…)

Elevate Your Knee -- When resting, raise your knee above the level of your heart. According to Wikipedia, "Elevation aims to reduce swelling by increasing venous return of blood to the systemic circulation. This will result in less edema…"

Take Anti-Inflammatory Medications -- Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are an excellent solution to help fight the swelling in your knee. The less swelling, the faster your knee heals! (Our list of Faves has an excellent NSAID to try…)

Use Orthotics -- Orthotics are more than just foot and knee support; they can help to correct your pronation and improve your running posture. If a new pair of running shoes doesn't deal with the problem, buy a pair of orthotics to use in your shoes. It can help to improve your stride and reduce pain.

Note: A study published in the Journal of Applied Biomechanics found that orthotics may have only minimal effects on hip and knee joint mechanics. 

Runners Knee Exercises and Stretches

If you're trying to prevent and treat runner's knee, exercising is one of the best ways to do so! Here is everything you need to know:

Strengthen Your Hips

According to multiple articles, having weak hips is one of the biggest contributors to runner's knee:

It's not weak quadriceps that cause the problems, but weak hips!

Here are a few exercises to strengthen your hips:

Side Lying Hip Abduction -- See how it's done...

Single Leg Hip Lift -- See how it's done...

Side to Side Knee Tucks -- See how it's done…

Lateral Squats -- See how it's done…

Split Squats -- See how it's done…

4-Way Cable Hip -- See how it's done…

Clamshells -- See how it's done…

With these exercises, you'll strengthen your hips and seriously reduce your risk of runner's knee!

Stretch Your Legs

You need to not only stretch your quads (the front of your thighs), but also your glutes, hamstrings, knees, and calves. Full lower body stretches help to limber up those muscles, loosening them up for your run.

Here are a few stretches to incorporate BEFORE and AFTER every run:

Anterior Hip Stretch -- See how it's done…

Knee Hug -- See how it's done…

Walking Straight Leg Kicks -- See how it's done…

Glute Bridge -- See how it's done…

Side to Side Leg Swing -- See how it's done…

Just a few minutes spent stretching can make all the difference in your runs!

Try Foam Rolling

Foam rolling helps to loosen up tight muscles and stiff joints, making it easier for you to run with correct posture.  Here are two videos with short foam rolling routines specifically for Runner's Knee:

Use Foam Roller To Get Rid Of Runners' Knee

Foam Rolling Trick for Getting Rid of Runner's Knee

 

Below, we have a list of a few items you'll need to treat runner's knee! With their help and the advice above, you should be back out on the streets in no time!


Editorial staff

6 Best Ways to Treat Runner's Knee

6 Best Ways to Treat Runner's Knee

Read Video Infographic Tips

Running is one of the best forms of cardio, hands down! Not only is it amazing exercise, but you'll find that it's wonderfully freeing to hit the open road and run the hours away. You sort of self-hypnotize as you focus on your breath, your muscles, and your running. It's a great way to get in a wicked lower body/cardio workout!

But, if you are a regular runner, you may find yourself suffering from one of the most common injuries: runner's knee.

Did You Know: Up to 40% of complaints in sports medicine clinics are runner's knee? 25% of the general recreational running population suffers from runner's knee!

Here is everything you need to know about this injury…

What is Runner's Knee?

Runner's knee is the simple name for "patellofemoral pain syndrome", a repetitive stress injury that occurs when the kneecap (patella) rests on your thighbone. The bone on bone contact can cause pain--both acute (sharp) and chronic (dull)--along with a number of other symptoms (see below).

Oddly enough, the pain may disappear when you run, only to return when you cool down. There are a number of things that can cause this knee pain after running:

Biomechanical issues -- If your leg bones are out of position, misaligned, or malformed from birth, or your kneecap is slightly out of position, the impact on your legs won't be evenly distributed. These biomechanical issues will place higher stress on certain parts of your body, leading to wear and potential injuries to your joints.

Overuse --As mentioned above, runners knee is a repetitive stress injury, which can result from overuse of the joint. If you perform a lot of high-impact activity (lower body workouts, running, jump training, etc.), the activity can cause inflammation in the kneecap joint. Tendons that have been overstretched may also be the cause.

Direct trauma -- If you fall and land directly on your knee, the trauma may lead to runner's knee. The same is true for a direct blow to the kneecap.

Muscular weakness/imbalance -- If your thigh and hip muscles are poorly conditioned, they aren't able to bear up under the strain of your running. Your body will usually make up for it by adjusting your gait or shifting your weight, which could lead to incorrect running posture and ultimately knee injuries. Weak or tight hamstrings, hips, quads, glutes, and lower back muscles can all contribute to a higher risk of knee injuries.

Foot problems -- If you have flat feet, high arches, feet that turn inward or outward, or hypermobile feet (ankle and foot joints that move more than "normal"), your stride may cause wear and tear on your joints, or can lead to biomechanical issues with your knees. The joints and tissues of your knee will be strained, leading to runner's knee.

Symptoms of Runners Knee

Many people experience knee pain after running--or even during their run-- but how can you know if it's runner's knee or some other injury?

According to Web MD, runner's knee is a very specific type of pain. It will be located around or behind your kneecap, particularly where the patella meets the femur (your thigh bone). However, Breaking Muscle states that the pain is located at the front of the knee, often below the kneecap.

If this is a bit too vague to help you be certain, here are a few more symptoms of runner's knee to look out for:

Pain during exercise -- The pain will usually set in SPECIFICALLY during exercises that involve repeated bending of your knee: Squats, Lunges, Stair Climbing, Jumping, etc.

Pain when you bend your knee -- When you walk, kneel, squat, or stand up, does your knee hurt? Such simple activities shouldn't cause knee pain, so any discomfort is a sign that something is wrong. The pain will usually grow worse when you walk downhill or go down stairs.

Pain after long periods of sitting -- When you stand up from your office desk, the movie theater, or in an airplane, do your knees hurt? Pain after prolonged periods of sitting are an indication of runner's knee.

Swelling -- Swelling is ALWAYS a sign of injury! While it's not specific to just one knee injury, it's a good indication (when combined with other signs) that the problem is runner's knee.

Grinding/Popping/Crackling --Does your knee make sounds when you stand up? If your knees grind, pop, or crack--especially after sitting or when climbing stairs--it's an indication of runner's knee.

These symptoms all point toward runner's knee, but there's only one way to be certain: get checked out! Get yourself to a doctor for a physical exam, or undergo an MRI, X-rays, or CT Scan to be certain that it's runner's knee and not some other knee problem.

Note: Runner's knee is NOT the same as a meniscus tear. The pain of a meniscus tear is located on the inner (medial) or outer (lateral) sides of your knee. Meniscus tear symptoms are similar to runner's knee symptoms (pain when moving or exercising), but your knee will often swell up, lock, or even give way when you use your legs. Torn meniscus treatment differs from treatment for runner's knee, which is why it's so important that a doctor diagnoses the problem after a thorough exam.

How to Treat Runner's Knee

There's good news and bad news about runner's knee pain treatment:

The Bad News: You're going to have to quit running for a while, at least until your knee heals. This may be a hard saying for some, but it's worth it!

The Good News: You'll be back on your feet sooner than you'd think. Runner's knee is usually a fairly minor injury, so time and simple knee pain treatment will usually be enough to deal with the problem!

Before we get into treatment for runner's knee, let's look at a few ways to PREVENT it:

  • Change Your Running Surface -- Instead of running on concrete or hard-packed earth, run on a softer surface: running tracks, forest trails, grass, etc. The softer the surface, the less impact on your joints! 
  • Increase Mileage Gradually -- Did you know that adding too much distance to your runs can increase your risk of injuries? Make it a point to only increase mileage by 10% per week!
  • Add More Hill Work -- Your body needs to get used to tackling hills--both up and downhills. Don't push yourself too hard, but do acclimate your body to hills by adding more hill work to your runs.
  • Shorten Your Stride on Hills -- The longer your stride on up- and down-hills, the greater the impact on the joints. When running up and down hills, shorten your stride and slow your run speed. You'll engage your leg and core muscles more effectively, taking the strain off your knees.
  • Find the Right Shoes -- You need a pair of shoes with the right arch support and cushioning, and that fit well. Buy shoes specifically for the type of running you do! (Check out our article Shoes Matter, Here's How to Choose the Best Running Shoes for You for a complete guide to choosing running shoes…)
  • Strengthen Your Lower Body -- If your hips, glutes, hamstrings, quads, and lower back muscles aren't able to handle the strain, you're more likely to suffer injuries. Spend more time strengthening those muscles in order to keep up with your runs!

These things will all help you to avoid runner's knee in the future, but what can you do to deal with the problem RIGHT NOW?

Rest -- Most important of all, it's time to GET OFF THAT LEG! The more you use the knee, the longer it will take for your body to repair the damage. You may not be able to spend weeks in bed, but you should try to limit your movement until the pain goes away. Definitely take a break from running for a week or three.

Ice Your Knee -- Ice helps to reduce swelling, speeding up the healing process. As you are giving your knees a rest, apply an ice pack to the injured area. You'll find that it will do wonders! (Check out the Faves below for an EPIC ice pack…)

Use a Compress/Knee Brace -- It's always a good idea to wrap your knee or use a knee brace when injured. Why is this? Knee support serves two purposes: it reduces the risk of further injury, and it increases blood flow to the injured area. Wrap the knee with an ACE bandage or wear a knee brace for a few days after the pain disappears. (We've got a few good options in the Fave list below…)

Elevate Your Knee -- When resting, raise your knee above the level of your heart. According to Wikipedia, "Elevation aims to reduce swelling by increasing venous return of blood to the systemic circulation. This will result in less edema…"

Take Anti-Inflammatory Medications -- Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are an excellent solution to help fight the swelling in your knee. The less swelling, the faster your knee heals! (Our list of Faves has an excellent NSAID to try…)

Use Orthotics -- Orthotics are more than just foot and knee support; they can help to correct your pronation and improve your running posture. If a new pair of running shoes doesn't deal with the problem, buy a pair of orthotics to use in your shoes. It can help to improve your stride and reduce pain.

Note: A study published in the Journal of Applied Biomechanics found that orthotics may have only minimal effects on hip and knee joint mechanics. 

Runners Knee Exercises and Stretches

If you're trying to prevent and treat runner's knee, exercising is one of the best ways to do so! Here is everything you need to know:

Strengthen Your Hips

According to multiple articles, having weak hips is one of the biggest contributors to runner's knee:

It's not weak quadriceps that cause the problems, but weak hips!

Here are a few exercises to strengthen your hips:

Side Lying Hip Abduction -- See how it's done...

Single Leg Hip Lift -- See how it's done...

Side to Side Knee Tucks -- See how it's done…

Lateral Squats -- See how it's done…

Split Squats -- See how it's done…

4-Way Cable Hip -- See how it's done…

Clamshells -- See how it's done…

With these exercises, you'll strengthen your hips and seriously reduce your risk of runner's knee!

Stretch Your Legs

You need to not only stretch your quads (the front of your thighs), but also your glutes, hamstrings, knees, and calves. Full lower body stretches help to limber up those muscles, loosening them up for your run.

Here are a few stretches to incorporate BEFORE and AFTER every run:

Anterior Hip Stretch -- See how it's done…

Knee Hug -- See how it's done…

Walking Straight Leg Kicks -- See how it's done…

Glute Bridge -- See how it's done…

Side to Side Leg Swing -- See how it's done…

Just a few minutes spent stretching can make all the difference in your runs!

Try Foam Rolling

Foam rolling helps to loosen up tight muscles and stiff joints, making it easier for you to run with correct posture.  Here are two videos with short foam rolling routines specifically for Runner's Knee:

Use Foam Roller To Get Rid Of Runners' Knee

Foam Rolling Trick for Getting Rid of Runner's Knee

 

Below, we have a list of a few items you'll need to treat runner's knee! With their help and the advice above, you should be back out on the streets in no time!


Editorial staff

Faveable Giveaway

$100 Amazon Gift Card


Amazon Gift Card

 

67
Score 67

Details

The beauty of Advil is that it works! It's a simple medication that can be bought at nearly every store in the country, and it provides quick-acting pain relief.

What the Reviewers Say:

  • I can't believe what an excellent pain reliever this over the counter drug is. Also, I believe it is not as bad for your body as Tylenol ( which doesn't work for me).
  • Advil is a lifesaver for me. I have had an Ibuprofen prescription for 800mg Ibuprofen taken up to 4 times a day ( that's 3200mg ) and it does nothing for my pain, as 800mg Advil makes me feel very good even on the most painful days.
  • I was searching for good tablets for situations in such I have pain and I selected this ones.I really like them, the pain relief comes in no more than 20 minutes after you have used them and the quality is great for the price.I recommend this for any emergency situations.

 

73
Score 73

Details

This bad boy was designed by a former NASA engineer, and it's one of the most efficient ice packs around!

What Reviewers Say:

  • This pad holds hot and cold very well. More importantly, the clay filling is malleable, so it conforms to all lounging positions as well as the contours of a hand or foot. I have four of them & recommend this line to anyone who asks.
  • hey are heavy, but that's also kind of soothing. The clay is malleable and it's easy to conform it to your body. It gets nice and cold and stays that way for a solid 20 minutes (it shouldn't be worn longer than that, though). The straps are also very useful.
  • Believe me you'll throw your ice pack as far as you can throw after using these! No mess, wrap it arond your knee, elbow, ankle or whatever:. once the velcro strap is fastened, lay back in the recliner and say "aaaahh"! If you move slowly you can even walk over and get the remote or go to the powder room and back without it coming off.

 

92
Score 92

Details

For wrapping tight around any injury, this is the bandage of choice. Found in EVERY athlete's bag, it provides the protection and support your injury needs.

What Reviewers Say:

  • I've been wearing Ace Bandages for over 40 years to control swelling in my feet and ankles. I've tried others but they just don't stand up to washing and drying. These were rock-bottom priced and delivered in a few days.
  • My local pharmacy gave me the newer elastic style - no good. Needed to support a knee that likes to collapse and this is the one. Supportive, doesn't wad up under the knee, and the clips hold firm.
  • There is a reason ACE is a genericized trademark for these types of "bandages". They truly are the best elastic bandages on the market. My one complaint would be that they don't make super long bandages which would help when icing your torso (lower-back). But they are so strong that it makes up for the lack of length. I need to use 2 ACE Bandages for my lower-back but they hold the ice in place so well you never have to worry about it slipping. I don't like the clips that come with the bandages and prefer to just tuck the bandage under itself to hold it in place.

 

84
Score 84

Details

With hinges on either side of the knee, this brace protects your joints while you lift, run, and train hard. As a bonus, it's supremely comfortable.

What Reviewers Say:

  • Since I have this product, my knee is pefectly stable while wearing it, with no lack of motion. although many people said, order onw size up, I followed the sizing instructions and went with the reccomended size. I could see how people thought it was too small, but by loosening the straps completely and removing them from the slots before pulling it on, it comes on easily, and after strapping it all up i feel very secure.
  • I bought a pair of these for both knees. I tore my right MCL (Grade II tear) 2 years ago while snow skiing. I took a season off and I am now skiing again. I am preparing for a trip to Keystone, Colorado so I bought these to protect BOTH knees. I tested them this weekend skiing at Cascade. THEY WORKED GREAT. I completely forgot I was wearing them. They did not hurt or hinder my natural skiing motion. I hit some aggressive turns and I felt not knee pain. Afterwards, my knees felt fine with no pain. Overall, I am SUPER PLEASED with this purchase. The lateral support is excellent at this price point.
  • It is a little pricey, but I decided to finally give it a try after reading a bunch of reviews. Totally worth the money. Stays put on my knee after 10 hours of work. Gets itchy sometimes, but doesn't hurt or irritate the back of my knee like other braces. Offers a ton of support.

 

76
Score 76

Details

The lightweight, low profile knee braces are ideal for athletes and heavy lifters with knee problems.

What Reviewers Say:

  • I got mine from my orthopedic surgeon (insurance paid for it) after tearing my ACL, MCL, LCL, and meniscus playing football in 7th grade and It is still working fine now as a sophomore in high school. I play Football, hockey, lacrosse, golf, and even kickball plus with it plus i also wear it while working out, so year-round use for 3 and a half years and for it to be working is incredible especially considering how sweaty (i kept it in my hockey bag which is extremely sweaty), wet, and muddy it has gotten over those years. I had to have run/walked/skated hundreds of miles with it on. And it has taken a major beating with helmets hitting it in football, sticks constantly hitting it in lacrosse, and the bar hitting it while doing lifts such as hang clean and deadlift.
  • Very good brace. I use it daily - performing both Karate and Tai Chi. It is a substantial brace and the knee pain I had been experiencing has all but quit... I will say it take about two weeks to get used to the feeling of this brace, but I would not go without it for my sporting events.
  • With a bad knee this brace has allowed me to be more active and more protected. It is very sturdy. 

 

 

95
Score 95

Details

This is a simple foam roller that gets the job done! It's easy to use, portable, and compact, making it the perfect choice no matter where you are.

What Reviewers Say:

  • I like it because: It is firmer than a basic white foam roller, allowing you to use more pressure and work out deep knots or tension better. (Note: you can easily change the angle at which you use it to keep pressure light.) It holds its shape. The basic foam rollers will dent in and break down with use, this product will retain its shape and thus will not need to be replaced.
  • This thing is fantastic. I own a inversion table and loved it. I tried this at a friends and liked the results. Purchased one for a client and used it during our sessions, then finally purchased one for myself. Since then the inversion table collects dust and my back feels great.
  • The different zones of the roller work very well especially for those muscles that take a lot of work to soften up like the i.t. band. The size is compact and just right for me being a tall guy. I'm able to get my roll on in a limited amount of space and the best part is I can easily throw The Grid right in my gym bag. Portability is key when you're on the move a lot and when you also work out in a lot of different places. One thing I will say is if you're not use to a foam roller it can be a little painful at first, trick is to shift your weight until the pressure is just right for you. Eventually you'll get use to what The Grid is doing for you and you also might gain a bit of strength as well rolling on certain areas depending on your positioning.

Editor: Health & Active, Food & Drink, Entertainment

Fitness has come hard for Andy; he's had to work for it. But, his trials have led him to becoming a martial artist, a NFPT-certified fitness trainer, and a man passionate about exercise and healthy living. That’s why he’s our resident fitness expert.

His favorite food is lettuce-leaf steak tacos – though he’ll admit to a love of hot wings if you leverage the right pressure.

We know him as the guy who understands British humor and wishes everyone was as passionate about life as he is. His previous forays into the worlds of international business and education have left him wildly optimistic. And, if that wasn’t enough, he also writes comic books. Can you say renaissance?

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